09/28/16

Flour n. (ˈflaʊə, flou′ər, flour)

flour

(ˈflaʊən

1. (Cookery) a powder, which may be either fine or coarse, prepared by sifting and grinding the meal of a grass, espwheat
2. (Cookery) any finely powdered substance

 

Many of us think that flour is flour is flour…except it’s not. Like with olive oil and wines, there are many grades of flour. These include some of the following: low-gluten, high starch, high protein, gluten-free, grain based, wheat based, phosphated, and the list goes on.

 Today’s post is about flour, in case you’d not noticed, ahem… Specifically, we’ll talk about Lyon Bakery’s custom-made flour.

 Custom Flour

What is it and why do we use it?

Since 2003, Lyon has bought its flour directly from the mill. We always knew we wanted to work with flour that contained certain characteristics (such as being more nutritious) to best serve our needs, and those of our customers.

The flour we custom order is enriched, has never been bleached, does not contain bromate, and comprises the right protein and enzyme activity. The mill sends us freshly milled flour and we then age it the desired amount of time in our own silos.

We specify the protein amount as between 11-12%. Why? We want the extra nourishment for our customers — and a lot of our customers are children and young adults. In addition, this ratio gives our dough/bread its artisanal characteristic.

Getting the customization right has taken a lot of trial and error over the years!

We now have exactly the ratios and combination that we are happy with. Lyon Bakery is committed to using the highest quality ingredients with the most nutritious values possible.

 

What is Enriched flour?

Kernels of wheat are harvested, dried, stored then milled. During the milling and the very important sifting process, the kernel that’s made up of bran, endosperm and germ is taken apart.

The endosperm (the white part of the kernel) is the least nutritious part. The germ contains vitamins and oils. The bran contains the majority of the fiber.

Since the 1930s, when Wonder Bread was the bread of the moment, in order to replace some of the sifted-out good stuff (the vitamins, oils and fiber), the US government suggested that all flour be enriched with vitamins (including the addition of folic acid).

 

So, as one can see, flour is quite a scientific-related ingredient!